Circular Economics:

The next step for the fashion industry

Circular Fashion

Circular economics is all about harnessing the value of existing products that are ‘no-longer needed’ by consumers. By identifying, repairing and recycling these items, their value can once again be realised so that new products don’t always have to be produced.

The fashion industry produces

0 Billion tonnes

of CO2

every year

Where it all began...

“I founded Stylecrate after learning about the disastrous impacts that the fashion industry has on our planet and the hazardous conditions that many garment workers face on a daily basis. Compelled to work on a solution, I started Stylecrate to see if there was a better way that we could experience fashion – a way that would allow us to be more in touch with the clothes we wear and the people who made them”

                              ~ Jonathan, Founder CEO  

Our Values

We operate around an ethical framework which gives us a greater perspective on the impacts of our business. When approaching any business decision, we ask questions like “how will this impact the environment?”, “who will make these?” and “what will happen to this when we no longer use it?”. We do this because we believe it benefits everyone in the long run; our customers, our suppliers, the environment and indeed the rest of the fashion industry. 


It takes

0

litres of water

to make 1Kg of cotton

Up to

0 %

of all marine microplastics are from synthetic clothing

Our Goals

  1. To educate people about the state of the fashion industry and to show them how they can help. 
  2. To provide a platform for people to discover amazing new sustainable brands.
  3. To give people a new way to experience fashion through a circular economy rather than a linear one.
 
 

Moral Grounding

Businesses that are founded upon a moral grounding will stop at nothing to achieve their goals. To discover more about the motivation behind Stylecrate, listen to the Unknown Origins podcast featuring Stylecrate’s Founder and CEO, Jonathan Burns, who discusses the current state of the fashion industry and the importance of motivation in business.

The Doughnut

Sorry foodies, I’m not talking about sugar-glazed Krispy Kremes. No. I’m talking about humanity’s best shot at sustaining a long term regenerative economy that respects both environmental constraints and social limits (obviously). Economists call this the ‘doughnut’ because that happens to be the best way to visualise it. 

The doughnut’s circular shape denotes how goods should be constantly up-cycled into new products that provide value for consumers and businesses alike. If we’re going to be a society of consumers then we have to learn to deal with our waste. The reason that it’s a doughnut and not a circle is because of the two limits that our economy must operate between: environmental constraints and social foundations. 

Environmental constraints are the nine planetary boundaries, which, if we exceed, could push Earth’s natural systems towards dangerous tipping points, beyond which there is little hope of recovery. 

circular fashion

The social foundations are internationally agreed-upon standards of acceptable living conditions for humans. Failing to respect one of these limits will have a direct impact on the other. For example, environmental negligence leads to increased air and water pollution and ocean acidification. 

This creates health problems amongst the population which causes a rise in demand for expensive healthcare treatments and shrinks the pool of available healthy workers thus causing an economic shortfall. 

Equally, at a social level, low education and literacy rates can fail to make people aware of environmental damage that they may cause in the future either directly through their own decisions or indirectly whilst working for a larger organisation. The two limits are therefore strongly linked to each other and we humans have narrow ‘doughnut’ in which to operate responsibly. 

What this means for fashion...

A circular fashion industry is one that realises the full value of all the garments that already exist in order to avoid overproduction. There are many ways in which this can be done but the most obvious way is to share your clothes. When you no longer want an item of clothing, pass it on or sell it so that someone else won’t have to buy something new. 

Circular fashion is about finding new business models that trend towards re-using and not replacing. These are already popping into existence in the form of fashion resale platforms like Depop and through brand-powered marketplaces like Trove

As environmental catastrophe catches up with the fast fashion empire, these emerging business models will become the staples of the new circular fashion industry. 

Circular Economics:

The next step for the fashion industry

Circular Fashion

Circular economics is all about harnessing the value of existing products that are ‘no-longer needed’ by consumers. By identifying, repairing and recycling these items, their value can once again be realised so that new products don’t always have to be produced.

The fashion industry produces

0 Billion tonnes

of CO2

every year

Where it all began...

“I founded Stylecrate after learning about the disastrous impacts that the fashion industry has on our planet and the hazardous conditions that many garment workers face on a daily basis. Compelled to work on a solution, I started Stylecrate to see if there was a better way that we could experience fashion – a way that would allow us to be more in touch with the clothes we wear and the people who made them”

                              ~ Jonathan, Founder CEO  

Our Values

We operate around an ethical framework which gives us a greater perspective on the impacts of our business. When approaching any business decision, we ask questions like “how will this impact the environment?”, “who will make these?” and “what will happen to this when we no longer use it?”. We do this because we believe it benefits everyone in the long run; our customers, our suppliers, the environment and indeed the rest of the fashion industry. 

It takes

0

litres of water

to make 1Kg of cotton

Up to

0 %

of all marine microplastics are from synthetic clothing

Our Goals

  1. To educate people about the state of the fashion industry and to show them how they can help. 
  2. To provide a platform for people to discover amazing new sustainable brands.
  3. To give people a new way to experience fashion through a circular economy rather than a linear one.
 
 

The Doughnut

Sorry foodies, I’m not talking about sugar-glazed Krispy Kremes. No. I’m talking about humanity’s best shot at sustaining a long term regenerative economy that respects both environmental constraints and social limits (obviously). Economists call this the ‘doughnut’ because that happens to be the best way to visualise it. 

The doughnut’s circular shape denotes how goods should be constantly up-cycled into new products that provide value for consumers and businesses alike. If we’re going to be a society of consumers then we have to learn to deal with our waste. The reason that it’s a doughnut and not a circle is because of the two limits that our economy must operate between: environmental constraints and social foundations. 

Environmental constraints are the nine planetary boundaries, which, if we exceed, could push Earth’s natural systems towards dangerous tipping points, beyond which there is little hope of recovery. 

circular fashion

The social foundations are internationally agreed-upon standards of acceptable living conditions for humans. Failing to respect one of these limits will have a direct impact on the other. For example, environmental negligence leads to increased air and water pollution and ocean acidification. 

This creates health problems amongst the population which causes a rise in demand for expensive healthcare treatments and shrinks the pool of available healthy workers thus causing an economic shortfall. 

Equally, at a social level, low education and literacy rates can fail to make people aware of environmental damage that they may cause in the future either directly through their own decisions or indirectly whilst working for a larger organisation. The two limits are therefore strongly linked to each other and we humans have narrow ‘doughnut’ in which to operate responsibly. 

What this means for fashion...

A circular fashion industry is one that realises the full value of all the garments that already exist in order to avoid overproduction. There are many ways in which this can be done but the most obvious way is to share your clothes. When you no longer want an item of clothing, pass it on or sell it so that someone else won’t have to buy something new. 

Circular fashion is about finding new business models that trend towards re-using and not replacing. These are already popping into existence in the form of fashion resale platforms like Depop and through brand-powered marketplaces like Trove

As environmental catastrophe catches up with the fast fashion empire, these emerging business models will become the staples of the new circular fashion industry. 

Circular Economics:

The next step for the fashion industry

Circular Fashion

Circular economics is all about harnessing the value of existing products that are ‘no-longer needed’ by consumers. By identifying, repairing and recycling these items, their value can once again be realised so that new products don’t always have to be produced.

The fashion industry produces

0 Billion tonnes

of CO2

every year

Where it all began...

“I founded Stylecrate after learning about the disastrous impacts that the fashion industry has on our planet and the hazardous conditions that many garment workers face on a daily basis. Compelled to work on a solution, I started Stylecrate to see if there was a better way that we could experience fashion – a way that would allow us to be more in touch with the clothes we wear and the people who made them”

           ~ Jonathan, Founder CEO  

It takes

0

litres of water

to make 1Kg of cotton

Our Values

We operate around an ethical framework which gives us a greater perspective on the impacts of our business. When approaching any business decision, we ask questions like “how will this impact the environment?”, “who will make these?” and “what will happen to this when we no longer use it?”. We do this because we believe it benefits everyone in the long run; our customers, our suppliers, the environment and indeed the rest of the fashion industry. 

Up to

0 %

of all marine microplastics are from synthetic clothing

Our Goals

  1. To educate people about the state of the fashion industry and to show them how they can help. 
  2. To provide a platform for people to discover amazing new sustainable brands.
  3. To give people a new way to experience fashion through a circular economy rather than a linear one.
 

Moral Grounding

Businesses that are founded upon a moral grounding will stop at nothing to achieve their goals. To discover more about the motivation behind Stylecrate, listen to the Unknown Origins podcast featuring Stylecrate’s Founder and CEO, Jonathan Burns, who discusses the current state of the fashion industry and the importance of motivation in business.

The Doughnut

Sorry foodies, I’m not talking about sugar-glazed Krispy Kremes. No. I’m talking about humanity’s best shot at sustaining a long term regenerative economy that respects both environmental constraints and social limits (obviously). Economists call this the ‘doughnut’ because that happens to be the best way to visualise it. 

The doughnut’s circular shape denotes how goods should be constantly up-cycled into new products that provide value for consumers and businesses alike. If we’re going to be a society of consumers then we have to learn to deal with our waste. The reason that it’s a doughnut and not a circle is because of the two limits that our economy must operate between: environmental constraints and social foundations. 

Environmental constraints are the nine planetary boundaries, which, if we exceed, could push Earth’s natural systems towards dangerous tipping points, beyond which there is little hope of recovery. 

circular fashion

The social foundations are internationally agreed-upon standards of acceptable living conditions for humans. Failing to respect one of these limits will have a direct impact on the other. For example, environmental negligence leads to increased air and water pollution and ocean acidification. 

This creates health problems amongst the population which causes a rise in demand for expensive healthcare treatments and shrinks the pool of available healthy workers thus causing an economic shortfall. 

Equally, at a social level, low education and literacy rates can fail to make people aware of environmental damage that they may cause in the future either directly through their own decisions or indirectly whilst working for a larger organisation. The two limits are therefore strongly linked to each other and we humans have narrow ‘doughnut’ in which to operate responsibly. 

What this means for fashion...

A circular fashion industry is one that realises the full value of all the garments that already exist in order to avoid overproduction. There are many ways in which this can be done but the most obvious way is to share your clothes. When you no longer want an item of clothing, pass it on or sell it so that someone else won’t have to buy something new. 

Circular fashion is about finding new business models that trend towards re-using and not replacing. These are already popping into existence in the form of fashion resale platforms like Depop and through brand-powered marketplaces like Trove

As environmental catastrophe catches up with the fast fashion empire, these emerging business models will become the staples of the new circular fashion industry.